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Posts Categorized: Logos
robmarsh
Rob Marsh
Admin, Logodesign.com
Filed under Animals, Illustration, Logos.

Monkeying Around with Logos

We recently announced that we had just started our 200,000th project here in our logo design studio. Most of those projects were logos for small businesses, though many were websites, brochures, custom illustrations, and even word and powerpoint templates. And a lot of those projects were for products, services, or companies with “monkey” in the name. You might say we’ve done barrels of them—all unique in some way. (Of course, we wouldn’t say that, it’s a little too silly, but you might.) Here are a few of my favorites:

The first is a custom illustration we did a few years ago for Math Monkey (an organization that teaches kids math in a fun, easier-to-learn ways).

Next up is a logo we recently completed for a new media company. Our instructions were “the sillier, the better.”  It’s a lot of fun:

Last monkey logo for today was created not too long ago for a new start-up. They asked for a logo with “splat.” This one delivers:

If you need a monkey, bear, rooster, beaver, gopher, giraffe, dog, hippo, or any other animal in your next design project , visit the logo design experts featured at Logodesign.com. We’d love to help.

robmarsh
Rob Marsh
Admin, Logodesign.com
Filed under Food, Holidays, Logos.

Designing Cinco de Mayo

It’s Cinco de Mayo, which we have traditionally celebrated with more than twenty bags of tortilla chips and gallons of salsa here in the design studio. This year we’re once again thinking about Mexico and logos, which naturally enough, we’ve done a bunch of. From salsa (the stuff you eat as well as the dance steps) to holiday celebrations, several clients have asked us to help create identities to match their Cinco de Mayo-ish products. Here are a couple from the archive, two concepts we put together a few years ago for a Cinco de Mayo celebration in St. Louis from a few years back.

 

 

 

Here’s hoping you have a great Cinco de Mayo from your favorite logo design studio.

robmarsh
Rob Marsh
Admin, Logodesign.com

See Our Work in Logo Lounge 6

We were thrilled to find out a few days ago that several of our designers will have their work featured in Logo Lounge 6—the latest in a series of well-respected design publications by Bill Gardner set to be published in February 2011. Nine of the logos in the upcoming book were created by the designers at our design shop. Here’s a preview of what you’ll see in the book next year:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As you can see, the selected artwork covers a wide range of styles and creativity in logo design. We’re grateful to Logo Lounge for selecting our work for inclusion in the book again this year (we have several logos in last year’s book too). Congratulations to Jerron, Josh, Justin, Paul, Curt, and Jose who created the “winning” marks.

As always, our designers would love to put together a few ideas for your next project. Check us out at Logodesign.com to get started.

robmarsh
Rob Marsh
Admin, Logodesign.com

2 More Things to Avoid with Your Logo

A few days ago, we wrote about three things you should never include in your logo. You can read that entry here. Of course, there are more than three things to avoid when you are working on your logo. Here are two more:

#1 Avoid using too many colors in your logo. When it comes to helping your customers remember your company and visual identity, simplicity is the key. The best brands choose a single color (in some cases two) to represent their business. Coke uses red—and only red. It’s not likely you’ll ever see a blue Coca-cola logo (but Pepsi uses blue). Prudential Financial uses blue. Starbucks uses green. And all of these brands have a version of their logo in black and white that is just as recognizable as the color version.

Over time, colors help customers easily recognize brands. We read color and shape before we read the information in those shapes, so your brain recognizes a Coke can before you can even read the name printed on it. Your logo deserves no less.

In addition, if you ever need to embroider your logo onto a uniform, promotional give-away, or materials in a retail store or office, having a logo with just one or two colors will help make it possible. Gradients and multiple colors make it far more difficult and in some cases impossible to create these products. The same is true if you need to print your logo in a small area, a simple one color logo will make the job much easier.

#2 Avoid using too many fonts in your logo. How many is too many? In most cases, two fonts would be too many. Once again, it’s all about creating a simple mark and avoiding anything that can make reading it more confusing or complex. Unless you have a very compelling reason to do otherwise, one font should be enough for your logo. At the risk of sounding like a broken record, make your mark as simple as possible. Choose fonts that are easily readable and represent what your company stands for.

Of course there are exceptions to every rule. There are logos that effectively use more than one color—the discontinued rainbow Apple logo is an example. (Although Apple had a single color version to use when necessary, which has since become their “official” logo.) And there are logos that effectively use more than one font, but usually one font is the mark, and the second font is a simple descriptor to help give context to the mark.

Bottom line: keep it simple.

Read about more things to avoid when creating your logo, here.

robmarsh
Rob Marsh
Admin, Logodesign.com

Icons or Logotype?

The vast majority of logo projects we get ask for an icon as part of the logo. There’s nothing wrong with this, of course. There are plenty of successful organizations with iconic logos—Nike, Apple, Major League Baseball, and AT&T, to name just four.

But there’s another option when it comes to your logo, the wordmark or logotype. There are plenty of successful companies that use this kind of logo as well: IBM, Fedex, Exxon, Disney and Microsoft.

So why do so many entrepreneurs ask for icons rather than wordmarks? I’m not sure I have a good answer for that question, except maybe people are trained to think of logos as images or pictures, rather than words. (This is true of both iconic logos and logotypes—we see them as pictures.) So, when customers think about logos, they literally think of icons and ask for them, rather than having the designer try to do something unique with the type.

In addition to iconic logos, our designers have come up with some pretty amazing logotypes. Here are two of my favorites from our archive. The first was a concept we presented to Sonoma Vinegar Works that makes use of colors and shapes to communicate the idea of grapes. I love this logo:

The second is for a small start-up down the street called Needle. Given the track record of the founders, it’s pretty likely you’ll be hearing more from them in the future.

 

 

Both of these logos include hidden elements (though not that hidden) and strong font choices, demonstrating that when they are done right, a logotype can be every bit as effective as an iconic logo—maybe more so. Something to consider if you’re thinking about creating a new logo for your organization.